Gas Land Essays

Natural Gas Fracking Risks Essay

Natural gas is said to be one of the most popular forms of energy today. In the past, often
left undeveloped and wasted, it was once considered “unusable” and “worthless”, compared to oil. In order to try to break our country’s dependence on foreign oil supplies, we have begun to dip into our own natural gas supply. Natural gas is found underground, and is produced when trapped gas is released above ground. Hydraulic fracturing or fracking is a process that extracts natural gas from the ground. As harmless as the billion dollar producing oil companies would want us to believe, environmental groups, scientists, and average citizens have raised concerns about the negative impact of hydraulic fracking on the environment and surrounding communities.
Hydraulic fracking is used in the natural gas drilling booms, like the one in Louisiana. “Modern day hydraulic fracturing results from the marriage of two technologies: hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. Although these technologies are not new, it was not until 2002 or 2003 that they were first combined” (Edwards and Oliver). “In a typical fracking operation, pressurized water, sand and chemicals are injected into shale rock formations to release trapped natural gas” (Edwards and Oliver). Since natural gas is trapped and then subsequently released from shale rock, thus the name has been given to large drilling locations such as the Haynesville Shale in Louisiana and the Barnette Shale in Texas. These drilling sites, often located in rural areas, have made the residents on whose land the drilling is occurring ,and the large drilling companies very wealthy. “Critics allege that the chemicals in fracking fluid pollute groundwater, cause cancer, and are responsible for a host of other health maladies, and that all fracking operations increase air pollution and overwhelm small communities” (Edwards and Oliver). As more and more natural gas locations are sprouting up so close to home, it makes sense to explore the risks proven to be associated with fracking.
Groundwater polluting of communities near natural gas drilling sites, has been linked to fracking. “At least 15 water-wells in Rosebud, Alberta, have gone bad since EnCana Corporation fracked into their aquifer in search of shale gas in 2004” (Nelson 25). By fracking into the aquifer, the chemicals used in the process undoubtedly contaminated the drinking water of the area. Nelson also reports of Rosebud resident, Jessica Ernst and her family’s experience with fracking. Ms. Ernst stated that Encana gas told her family that they would never fracture near her family’s aquifer. By 2005, Ms. Ernst says that her water started going bad, she was receiving horrible burns and rashes from showering, and her dogs refused to drink the water so that is when she began to pay attention (Nelson 25). It is a horrible thought that a person could get burnt taking a shower in their own home or not be able to provide their pets safe...

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Fracking Essay

1548 words - 6 pages Hydraulic Fracturing: Why the Bad Rep?Natural gas has been used in the home since the first century A.D. as a perfect heating source for daily living. It is used as a heating fuel and also used to cool. Natural gas is essential for everyone's daily life and it is more efficiently produced through a process called hydraulic fracturing....

The Politics of Natural Gas Production

1387 words - 6 pages The Politics of Natural Gas Production In 2010, roughly 25 percent of the nation’s energy came from natural gas, a “fossil fuel” which American consumers and businesses heavily depend on for transport, light, and heat (Squire 6). As the U.S. population increases, so do the country’s energy needs. Political debate over how the U.S. can meet those needs has slowly simmered for several decades, escalating exponentially when the energy supply...

The Federal Government Should Regulate Fracking

3310 words - 13 pages An individual’s environment plays a pivotal role in their overall health. The environment can affect a range of physical and mental processes, and is considered a defining factor of well-being. As a result, specific geographic areas are instrumental in shaping an individual’s health profile. This is clearly seen in the disparity between those living in areas exposed to toxic substances, versus individuals living in clean...

fracking

1452 words - 6 pages What's the Fracking Problem?W hy does everyone care so much about natural gas? Why is it such an essential part of modern culture? Sure, it's an exciting and up and coming technology, which is fuel for the technological generation that we've grown up in, but we need to take a closer look to see the methods and impacts that...

Hydraulic Fracking Should Not Be Allowed

1541 words - 6 pages Natural gas within shale rock formations is the new energy resource that is on the rise due to the decline of oil reserves in recent years. Though, the benefits of this recent discovery can be economically advantageous for our country’s future. However, we have ignored water and air as a natural resource. These two resources are taken for granted by people all over the world, possibly due to the high abundance of both. Water and our...

Natural Gas Production: Is it Worth the Cost?

723 words - 3 pages Your name10/1/2014Recitation day/time/TA nameCT #, Question #, ID ###-####-123Word Count: (25 + 417 + 43 + 15 + 25 + 21 = 547)Natural Gas Production: Is it Worth the Cost?Interpretation (25)Despite advancements in fracking technology lowering gas prices, its negative environmental and...

Fracking and its Effect on the Environment

1500 words - 6 pages Oil and natural gas companies have developed a way to drill for natural gas, a process called hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking. Natural gas is a flammable gas mixture consisting of methane and several other hydrocarbons that occur naturally underground. Natural gas is used as fuel for heating, cooking, and even in some automobiles like the “RideOn” buses. This technique has only recently become economically feasible with the rising...

Hydraulic Fracturing Must be Reformed

1884 words - 8 pages The multi-billion dollar gas industry is seeking to expand its production across the nation, in light of new technology making extracting natural gas much easier. A Healthy alternative to the fossil fuels we so frivolously use is now more critical than ever. In 2011, the United States used 18.83 million barrels of raw oil daily, and in 2010 19.18 million barrels of petroleum products and biofuels. In 2010 and 2011, that was nearly 22% of the...

Alternative Fuel for Airplane

2195 words - 9 pages One of the most significant current discussions in sustainable aviation is alternative fuel for airplane, which is a serious argument; however, big question is that efforts to produce a more sustainable fuel to power aircraft are technically and ethically feasible. This paper going to investigate and show there is no alternative fuel to power aircraft in this time. The fuel using by airplane is fossil fuel, which is Jet A1 by burning this fuel...

Hydraulic Fracturing: Fracking for a Better World

3582 words - 14 pages In recent years there has been great concern over the growing demand for energy, and the lack of non-renewable energy resources to meet the demand in the future. In addition, the question of “sustainability”—the ability to balance social, economic, and environmental needs in energy production to meet both current and long-term requirements—has come to the fore. It is clear that America must expand energy production quickly, and that we must...

The Controversy that Surrounds the Use of Fracking

1955 words - 8 pages The controversy that lies behind the use of 'Fracking' 7.2 Billion people heavily rely on oil in todays world. With such weighty demand comes a substantial amount of pressure for oil firms to extract, and supply hydrocarbons. This is a major reason as to why oil firms are reliant on hydraulic fracturing in order to extract fossil fuels miles beneath the ground. This cycle of demand and supply makes this subject vitally important to research...

The thesis of the documentary seeks to inform the audience on the environmental effects and human effects from natural gas drilling. Indeed, the documentary uses dark humor to discuss a detailed analysis on the broader effects of the controversial extraction method, hydraulic fracturing, or fracking that is rampant across the globe. The documentary seeks to negate the assertion that natural gas is a clean and safe alternative to oil. In addition, the documentary confirms that the fracked wells leak more often thus polluting the environment through water and air pollution, which endangers the environment and disturbs families (Fox Film).
Rhetorical (persuasive) Strategies in the Documentary
Notably, the documentary uses the three persuasive strategies, which include logos, pathos, and ethos. Moreover, the documentary uses rhetorical devices to apply the persuasive strategies to support the argument. In this context, I will focus on sound, speech, and visual images in discussing the rhetorical (persuasive) strategies in the documentary....
The speaker further says that, “a great deal of faith in people that we wouldn’t succumb to frenzy, or rage, or greed; that we’d figure out a solution without destroying the things that we love (Fox Film).” This comes in a convincing tone that asserts respect for the environment. More so, Josh Fox says that the proposal from the natural gas company to lease Fox’s family land for purposes of drilling natural gas generated a debate in the family. Indeed, Fox’s father initially had the thought of leasing the land for the $100,000 offer (Fox Film). On the other hand, Fox tells his father, ‘I think I have to look into this, so give me some time to go ahead and get the facts.” Indeed, even though, Fox said this in a commanding voice, Fox’s father allowed him to seek for facts and evidence regarding the effects of hydraulic fracturing on the community neighboring the drilling site. In fact, Josh Fox is the dominant narrator in the documentary where he gives a personal story. He engaged in interviews, discussions, and debates seeking to unearth the possible environmental effects of hydraulic fracturing. As a result, the film offers facts and evidence in spoken form through the interviews. We can actually experience Josh Fox talking with residents suffering from chronic health ailments that relate to air pollution and water contamination from the drilling of the natural gas using the hydraulic fracturing (Fox Film). This offers facts and evidence in spoken form through the discussions. More so, the residents report on their quest for justice where they visited the court to get an injunction seeking for damages from the natural gas companies. The court injunction mandated the ...Show more

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