Writing Assignment Jobs

  • Type
    Virtual Work
    Job
    Lambert Linguistics is Looking for Freelance Resume Writers

    Employer: Lambert Linguistics, LLC

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 12, 2018


    Job summary: We are seeking competent, organized, writers to work on resumes, cover letters, and LinkedIn profiles. No direct experience with resume writing is required as we will train you remotely.

  • Type
    Remote Work
    Job
    Blavity.com is Looking for a Content News Editor (remote work)

    Employer: Blavity.com

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 12, 2018


    Job summary: Blavity is seeking News Editor to edit and write content across the site and social media platforms. You should have substantial experience writing and editing news stories.

  • Type
    Remote Work
    Job
    Magpie Media is Hiring a Freelance Content Writer / Editor

    Employer: Magpie Media

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 12, 2018


    Job summary: Magpie Media is looking for an experienced Content Writer/Editor who is able to break through the jargon and create clear, compelling copy that lets audiences know who our clients are.

  • Type
    Freelance Work
    Job
    Write for the Peristeria Elata Foundation’s Website

    Employer: Peristeria Elata Foundation

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 12, 2018


    Job summary: We are looking for highly informative articles to publish on our website, well written, needing only minor revision. We invite writers to submit brief query letters about prospective articles.

  • Type
    Freelance Work
    Job
    ThisInsider.com Needs Freelance Writers to Cover a Variety of Topics

    Employer: Business Insider Inc.

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 12, 2018


    Job summary: ThisInsider.com needs Freelance Writers to cover a variety of topics: from travel, to health, to food to fitness, and everything in between. We publish everything from small breaking news posts to slideshows.

  • Type
    Freelance Work
    Job
    Kryo Inc. is Searching for Freelance Writers and Bloggers

    Employer: Kryo Inc.

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 12, 2018


    Job summary: Our marketing team at Kryo is searching for some creative minds to help us create a library of resources to use now and in the future.

  • Type
    Freelance Work
    Job
    Altitude Marketing is Hiring Freelance Writers to Write Content for Clients

    Employer: Altitude Marketing

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 11, 2018

  • Type
    Freelance Work
    Job
    Write about Online Accounting Software for AccountsPortal.com’s Blog

    Employer: AccountsPortal.com

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 11, 2018

  • Type
    Freelance Work
    Job
    RenderTribe is Seeking a Freelance Content Writer

    Employer: RenderTribe

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 11, 2018

  • Type
    Freelance Work
    Job
    Freelance Writer Needed to Curate Health and Wellness Content

    Employer: Confidential

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 11, 2018

  • Type
    Freelance Work
    Job
    Freelance Journalists Needed to Write Long-Form Articles for Out West Magazine

    Employer: D&B Supply

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 11, 2018

  • Type
    Freelance Work
    Job
    Freelance Entertainment Writers Needed to Write for ScreenRant.com

    Employer: ScreenRant.com

    ▶  Job Added: Mar 11, 2018

  • You’re progressing well through an interview process, and you think you’re close to landing that coveted offer, when the employer says, “One more thing—we have a little homework for you.”

    This tactic is used by a lot of companies (especially startups), and with good reason: The hiring manager gets a firsthand look at your approach, creativity, quality, turn-around speed, and communication and presentation style and can gauge how serious you are about the position.

    If you really want that job, your instinct will likely be to put your best foot forward and provide the most fabulous project the employer has ever seen. But there’s something else to consider: You may end up putting in many hours of work, creating an awesome deliverable—and at the end of it all, still not getting the job. There’s even a chance that the company will take the ideas you labored over for its own benefit, and you’re left not only without an offer, but without compensation for all that hard work.

    It’s happened to me: Once, at the end of a second round interview, a hiring manager asked me for a list of quick-hit ideas on increasing user engagement for his consumer website. I spent almost half a day coming up with a list of 10 great ideas, including many examples from other sites. After I proudly sent over my recommendations, I didn’t hear from the company for over two weeks. When I finally got a response, he thanked me for all my hard work and said that the company decided not to pursue the position at this time due to “internal matters.”

    Who knows if this really was the case; but to my surprise, I noticed a handful of my ideas were actually implemented within the next few months on their site. Maybe these were ideas already in motion and my assignment only confirmed what was planned, but I couldn’t help but feel that I had been somewhat “used” and regretted putting so much time and effort into this homework.

    While there are times you may want to go to the moon and back for a job , it’s also important to be careful how you approach these homework assignments—especially if you’re investing your time into applying to multiple jobs. Here are some tips on how to handle this tricky situation.

    1. Understand General Goals and Expectations

    First, it’s important to get a sense of how this assignment will factor into the overall evaluation of your candidacy. Is this the final hurdle before the job offer? (It should be.) How will this be weighed with other elements of your interview? (You should get some positive reinforcement that the company’s very interested and just wants to get a sense of how you work.) How long will the assignment take? (Being asked to spend more than 2-3 hours on an assignment before getting hired is bordering on disrespect.)

    Don’t be afraid to ask questions like, “Can you help me understand how this assignment will be evaluated?” “Are you looking more for big-picture ideas, or a detailed look at my recommendations?” “Roughly how much time do you recommend I put into this assignment?” It’ll help you understand what the company is looking for and how much time you’re willing to put forth.

    2. Ask for Data

    Next, remember that you have every right to ask for information that’ll help you better tackle the assignment and not start from scratch (if you were hired, that’s what you’d obviously do , right?). So, put some onus on the company to provide relevant data. For example, if the company is asking for your ideas on potential partners, ask questions that’ll point you in the right direction, like, “Who are your current partners?” “What types of partners are you currently pursuing?” “What are the key metrics that define a successful partnership?”

    And if the company doesn’t provide any more information? Do your best, but also make sure you express where you’ve made assumptions based on lack of information—e.g., “Without knowing what your current metrics for successful partnerships are, I’ve made suggestions for partners that will boost both brand awareness and website traffic. Obviously, if the company has different goals, I would be able to adjust these recommendations.”

    And then don’t worry—if the hiring manager doesn’t offer it, he or she will understand that you’re operating under lack of information and history.

    3. Outline Main Points, Only Tease the Details

    More often than not, the primary reason companies dole out homework is to get a better sense of your thought process, as well as how you structure and convey your thoughts and ideas. There’s not necessarily a “right” answer, nor is there a need to get way down in the weeds.

    So, don’t stress about providing a ton of information—just outline the main points (bullets and numbered lists usually work well). You can tease out more details as you’re talking through your assignment in the interview without having to write down your specific plans and fully fleshed out ideas. Remember: You don’t want the hiring manager to have the blueprints for your fabulous ideas—you want him or her to hire you so that you can be the one implement them!

    4. If You’re Worried, Get an NDA in Place

    Depending on the type of job function and level you’re interviewing for, it may not be a bad idea to request a non-disclosure agreement. If there is any confidential information you do not want shared widely, your assignment involves using data from your current employer, or you just have a nagging concern that the company may steal your best ideas, take a precaution and get a simple mutual NDA executed (many template NDA forms are available online for download). Don’t make it too legally formal—the company may get turned off by this move—just let the hiring manager know you just want to make sure things stay confidential and you’d be more comfortable providing details with a simple NDA in place. If he or she refuses to sign, this may be another warning flag.



    Knocking a homework assignment out of the park can be an amazing chance to show you’re the best candidate of the bunch, but you never want to get in a situation where you’re wasting your time or being used for free labor. Follow these guidelines, and you’ll be able to present a great deliverable while making sure you’re spending your time and effort the right way.

    Photo of man working courtesy of Shutterstock .

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