Actuaries Work Based Skills Essays On Abortion

Faculty News – December 2013

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He talked to MarketWatch about a pending H-P shareholder lawsuit and to KGO about a possible IPO of AMC Theaters.

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in Forbes about privacy issues with electronic data in cars.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was quoted in an extensive story in Bloomberg BNA about a privacy-legislation hearing held at SCU quoted about problems posed by state regulations affecting the Internet. KGO Radio also carried a story about the event. He was also quoted by SF Weekly about school Internet “snooping,” and by Bloomberg BusinessWeek about an online-review lawsuit, among other tech-law media mentions.
  • He was quoted in the Washington Post about protecting anonymous Internet content, among numerousother tech-law stories. His Technology and Marketing Law Blog was named one of the top 100 “Blawgs” by ABA Journal.

Deep Gulasekaram, Associate Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in a widely reprinted USA Today story about Sergio Gomez, an undocumented immigrant who is poised to be permitted to practice law in California. He also spoke to KTVU about the issue.
  • He co-wrote an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times about the limitations of the President’s powers to halt deportations. The piece also ran in several other sites or papers.

Al Hammond, Professor of Law

  • spoke to NPR’s Marketplace about efforts by tech giants like Google to own their own data-transmission cables so they don’t have to rely on telecom companies.

Paige Kaneb, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law, Northern California Innocence Project

  • She was quoted in a story in the Sacramento Bee about a couple accused of killing their adopted child despite what NCIP believes is a lack of evidence.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in several stories from the Mercury News, the Washington Post, SF Weekly, and others, about the next steps in the high-profile Apple Samsung case. The stories ran in hundreds of papers or sites.

Sandee Magliozzi, Associate Clinical Professor of Law and Director, Professional Development and Externships

  • She presented a paper with co-author Terri Mottershead at the University of St. Thomas Law Journal Fall Symposium “What Legal Employers and Clients Want—The Competency-Model Approach to Legal Success.” The topic was “Can Competencies Drive Change in the Legal Profession?”. The article will be published in the Journal’s upcoming symposium volume. Magliozzi also was a panelist in December at the 2013 Professional Development Institute in Washington DC on “How Legal Educators Are Shaping the Future of the Profession: Challenges, Triumphs, and Reflections from Around the World.”

Tyler Ochoa, Professor of Law


Cookie Ridolfi, Professor of Law


Margaret Russell, Professor of Law


Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  •  He wrote an op-ed about the tactic of “sue and settle” in environmental regulation, which ran in 89 different papers nationwide including the United Emirates’s The Gulf TodayDenver PostOrange County Register and the Kansas City Star.

Faculty News – November 2013

David Ball, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted by the San Francisco Daily Journal on  immigration policy impacts on Muslims.

Patricia Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in widely republished Bloomberg story about the coming tax headaches for same-sex married couples.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in U.S. News & World Report on the question of whether law school ought to be a two-year program, and in MarketWatch about Apple’s management.

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • Her comments to the Mercury News about NSA privacy issues appeared in nearly 20 additional stories.
  • She spoke to Associated Press about nondisclosure agreements linked to the mysterious barges being built by Google, for a story that appeared in more than 350 locations including the (Toronto) Globe and Mail, New York Post, the Republic, and the Weather Channel.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was a guest on NYC’s public radio station, discussing California’s “eraser button” law requiring online companies to remove records at the request of minors, a topic he also discussed in a widely cited Forbes op-ed. He discussed “revenge porn” laws in a widely republished New York Times story, in a Forbes op-ed, and in ABA Journal.  He wrote an article about anti-spam lawsuits for CircleID, was quoted in GigaOM about Facebook privacy settlements, and in MarketWatch about Yelp.
  • He discussed Yelp review issues with the Orange County Register and Search Engine Watch. He also talked about revenge porn with ABA Journal and Slate.com, among other tech news.

Deep Gulasekaram, Associate Professor of Law

  • He appeared on NBC Bay Area to discuss Sunnyvale’s anti-gun law, which is being fought by the NRA..

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in Law360 about patent infringement lawsuits.

Bob Peterson, Professor of Law

  • He was part of two panel discussions in Minneapolis in front of the Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) in Minneapolis on insurance issues relating to self-driving cars.
  • At the behest of the Griffith Foundation, on November 21 he gave the lunch-time address in Nashville to the National Conference of Insurance Legislators (NCOIL) on Subrogation. This group of state legislators meets to consider model laws and position papers relating to current insurance issues of trans-state or national importance.

Stephen Smith, Associate Clinical Professor of Law

  • He authored an article, “Defendant Silence and Rhetorical Stasis,” 46 Conn. L. Rev. 19 (Nov. 2013).

Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  • He was appointed to the board of Earthjustice, one of the largest public interest environmental law firms in the world. Read more…

Clinic and Center News – November 2013

  • The influence and success of Santa Clara Law’s High Tech Law Institute was the subject of a lengthy feature story in the legal publication The Recorder, and quoted or mentioned Eric Goldman, Colleen Chien, Laura Lee Norris, Brian Love and Fabio Marino, as well as several influential alumni.
  • Freed NCIP client George Souliotes was the subject of a front-page story in the LA Times and another client, Maurice Caldwell, was the subject of  a story in SF Weekly. The latter story quoted or mentioned Linda Starr, Cookie Ridolfi, and Paige Kaneb (NCIP).

Faculty News – October 2013

Evangeline Abriel , Director, Legal Analysis, Research and Writing Program and Clinical Professor of Law


Patricia Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was the keynote speaker at a National Conference in DC of the Tax Section of the American Institute of CPAs. About 600 to 700 CPAs participated in this event.
  • She was quoted in a Washington Post story about new tax issues facing married same-sex couples.
  • She was quoted on the tax issues following the Windsor case in a number of news publications, including the New York Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, and Tax Notes. She participated in a number of Continuing Legal Education programs to discuss the tax consequences of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) decision on couples in same-sex marriages. She has done telephonic webinars for the National Academy of Continuing Legal Education, the Tax Section of the ABA, Pincus Professional Education (California), and the ABA Real Property, Trust and Estate Law Section. She spoke on a plenary session about this issue at the National Conference sponsored by the National LGBT Association (an ABA affiliate) and also presented on three additional breakout panels at that conference. She participated in a panel discussion about the Windsor case and the recently issued Revenue Ruling at a Santa Clara Bar Association educational event. She also participated in a symposium at Elon Law School (in North Carolina) that focused on the Windsor case.

Colleen Chien, Associate Professor of Law

  • She is serving in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) as senior advisor for intellectual property and innovation to Todd Park, the U.S. chief technology officer. She will take a leave of absence from her teaching duties for at least a year to fulfill her new appointment, which began Sept. 16. In this role, she will advise Park on issues related to intellectual property and innovation, as well as privacy, open government, and civil liberties. Her work on patent trolls has sparked a national conversation, including a White House proposal for reform that repeatedly cited her research.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He spoke to Marketwatch about Twitter’s IPO. He also had a book published, Rights and Revolution: The Rise and Fall of Nicaragua’s Sandinista Revolution (Vandeplas Publishing).

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law


Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News and on ABC7 about Facebook’s changing decision on violent content on its site. More than a dozen other publications or sites used the story. His views on “revenge porn” Google’s ad policies and a hacker’s prison sentence for altering posts also continued to be in the news, appearing in about five dozen stories including a widely reprinted USA Today story.
  • He was named to ABA Journal’s list of top law blogs (Blawgs), he was named by Habeas as one of the top 5 lawyers to follow on Twitter, and he was listed on Excite.com list of Top 20 Law Blogs.
  • He was quoted in a wide array of tech stories, including a New York Times story that ran in over 50 outlets about a lawsuit alleging Google “wiretapping,” and a Washington Post story that appeared in about 100 outlets worldwide, about Google adding user reviews in their ads. He spoke to the Cincinnati Enquirer about a hacker being sentenced to six months in jail for changing users’ comments and to the International Business Times and WNYC, which aired on several other public radio stations, about laws against “revenge porn.”

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • His paper on the role of the federal executive on in spurring state immigration law was synopsized in ImmigrationProf Blog.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He published several articles, including “Expanding Patent Law’s Customer Suit Exception,” co-written with Jim Yoon and published in the Boston University Law Review; “Make the Patent ‘Polluters’ Pay: Using Pigovian Fees to Curb Patent Abuse,” co-written with Jim Bessen and published in the California Law Review; and “An Empirical Study of Patent Litigation Timing: Could a Patent Term Reduction Decimate Trolls Without Harming Innovators?,” published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review. He also coauthored an article, “Best Mode Trade Secrets” in the Yale Journal of Law and Technology. He recently published two op-eds: “Tax the Patent Trolls,” co-written with Jim Bessen and published in USA Today; and “No: Software Patents Don’t Spur Innovation, but Impede It,” published in the Wall Street Journal.

Jean Love, Professor of Law

  • She recently published a law review article, “Teaching Preliminary Injunctions After Winter,” in the St. Louis University Law Journal. She is a member of the SALT LGBT Committee, and in that capacity she assisted Professor Suzanne Goldberg in 2012–13 by editing Professor Goldberg’s amicus brief in the Perrycase (the Prop. 8 case)—an amicus brief that SALT later signed.

Kenneth Manaster, Professor of Law


Margaret Russell, Professor of Law

  • She is the recipient of a Fulbright fellowship by the Council for the International Exchange of Scholars. She will spend six months in Tanzania in 2014, researching human rights jurisprudence and documenting the work of the Tanzania Women Judges Association’s “Jurisprudence on the Ground” project.
  • She appeared on KQED’s Forum, to discuss the SCOTUS affirmative action case. Listen to the show here.

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy

  • He wrote an article, “Kiobel and Extraterritoriality: A Rule Without a Rationale,” which appeared in the Maryland Journal of International Law. He also co-authored an essay with Vivian Curran, “Reviving Human Rights Litigation After Kiobel,” which was published in the American Journal of International Law.

Gary Spitko, Professor of Law

  • He delivered a lecture in May, “The Enforceability of Arbitration Agreements After AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion,” at the 2013 California Appellate Judicial Attorneys Institute.

Stephanie Wildman , Professor of Law

  • She published a new casebook and teacher’s manual, Social Justice: Professionals, Communities, and Law 2d (2013) (with Martha Mahoney and John Calmore). She cowrote a chapter, “A Colorblindness Is the New Racism: Raising Awareness about Privilege Using Color Insight” (with Armstrong), in Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning As Allies in the Classroom (Kim A. Case ed., 2013). She also published several articles including “Revisiting Privilege Revealed and Reflecting on Teaching and Learning Together,” which appeared in the Washington University Journal of Law & Policy.

Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  • He was appointed to an American Bar Association task force on sustainable development. He also co-authored with Xuehua Zhang an article, “Public Participation in Environmental Enforcement … with Chinese Characteristics?: A Comparative Assessment of China’s Environmental Complaint Mechanism,” which appeared in the Georgetown International Environmental Law Review.

Faculty News – September 2013

Evangeline Abriel , Director, Legal Analysis, Research and Writing Program and Clinical Professor of Law

  • She presented oral arguments before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on September 11, 2013, in the case of Gonzalez-Salazar v. Holder.

Patricia Cain, Professor of Law

  • She spoke on three panels at the ABA Tax Section’s Joint Meeting in San Francisco (with Real Property, Trust and Estate Law) .
  • She was quoted in Bloomberg BusinessweekThe Advocate, and a widely reprinted New York Times story about state and federal  tax implications for gay married couples.
  • She was quoted in the New York Times, as well as Buzzfeed.com, about a landmark IRS ruling about gay married couples filing jointly.  Her appearance at a National LGBT Bar Association event was covered by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.
  • She participated in a special program sponsored by the ABA Section on Real Property, Trust and Estate Law called “Professor’s Corner.” She was on the line for an hour with a Harvard Law School Professor who runs their Estate Planning Clinic discussing the effect of the Windsor opinion on Estate Planning and answering live questions from practitioners around the country. There were over 200 lawyers participating in the call.

Colleen Chien, Associate Professor of Law

  • Her move to the White House made news in Politico, IPWatchdog.com, RoadRunner,  Law360, and Giga Om. Her research on patent “trolls” was also analyzed in a widely reprinted Wired.com story and she wrote an op-ed for TechCrunch — which also ran in other blogs — about what to do if your business is hit by a patent troll demand.
  • Her research on the impact of patent assertion entities was cited by an op-ed that ran in the LA Times and several other outlets, as well as by The American,Mobile Tech TodayCRMDaily, and other outlets.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law


Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • Her comments to the Mercury News about NSA privacy issues appeared in nearly 20 additional stories.
  • She was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News regarding the ongoing controversy over NSA surveillance.
  • She appeared on Nightly Business Report on CNBC about Twitter’s use in trading and stock markets. He also was quoted in Corporate Counsel about a controversial new service for “certifying” law schools.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was a guest on NYC’s public radio station, discussing California’s “eraser button” law requiring online companies to remove records at the request of minors, a topic he also discussed in a widely cited Forbes op-ed. He discussed “revenge porn” laws in a widely republished New York Times story, in a Forbes op-ed, and in ABA Journal.  He wrote an article about anti-spam lawsuits for CircleID, was quoted in GigaOM about Facebook privacy settlements, and in MarketWatch about Yelp.
  • He was quoted in a widely aired NPR news program about fingerprinting technologies, and in MediaPost about Yelp litigation over faked positive reviews. He also talked to KGO radio about tech lobbying.
  • He was quoted in the New York Times,  RedOrbit and the Atlantic Wire about Twitter’s general counsel stepping down. JD Supra quoted his comments to MediaPost about a case holding a website operator liable for defamation for a user’s comments.  He was quoted on the issue of “revenge porn” and other topics in the New York TimesSan Francisco ChronicleBusinessWeekHouston Chronicle, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, TechWeb, and Search Engine Watch.   More than a dozen publications or outlets carried a story quoting him about a YouTube lawsuit.

Kyle Graham, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News article about the Rim Fire in Yosemite, and possible criminal charges, jail time and restitution for the hunter who started it. Professor Graham is a former fire fighter nd deputy district attorney in Mono County, which abuts Yosemite. The story was carried by more than a dozen additional publications.

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • She spoke to KCBS radio on several occasions, about the International Trade Commission ruling in the Apple Samsung dispute.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in several stories, running in more than five dozen outlets including Financial Review, Wall Street Journal, and numerous papers affiliated with the San Jose Mercury News, about Apple and Samsung’s next legal battle.  He was quoted in The Recorder about a GAO report on patent litigation.

Northern California Innocence Project’s work on prosecutorial misconduct was cited in a ProPublica story about a Texas prosecutor charged with depriving a wrongfully imprisoned man of a fair trial.


Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • She published several articles, including “Cristina’s World: Lessons from El Salvador’s Ban on Abortion,” in Stanford Review of Law & Social Policy; “Two Truths and a Lie: In re John Z. Stories at the Juncture of Teen Sex and the Law,” in the Journal of Law &Social Inquiry; and “Getting Past Legal Analysis … or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Teaching Rape,” in the Creighton Law Review. She also delivered several conference speeches, including “Neonaticide and Access to Abortion: Why the Law Doesn’t Matter,” at Addressing Filicide: Inaugural International Conference for Cross National Dialogue (Prato, Italy, June, 2013); “Enlisting Doctors in the Post-Roe Abortion Wars: Informed Consent, Conscience Clauses & the Demise of Fiduciary Duty,” at the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, University of California at San Francisco Medical School (May, 2013); and “Informed Consent, Conscience Clauses, and the Newest Generation of Abortion Laws,” at the Stanford Law and Policy Review, Roe v. Wade at 40 Symposium (February, 2013).

Bob Peterson, Professor of Law

  • He was part of a panel discussion in Las Vegas in front of the State Insurance Trade Association (SITA) regarding insurance issues relating to self-driving cars.

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy

  • He spoke to NBC Bay Area News about the role of international law in Syria’s use of chemical weapons.

Gerald Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to KCBS radio about sentencing guidelines.
  • He was quoted in the Sacramento Bee regarding Goodwin Liu, the latest appointment to the California Supreme Court.

Santa Clara Law Events in the News


Full-Time Faculty News – August 2013

Margalynne Armstrong, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News discussing the reality of racial profiling and assumptions that disadvantage young black men.

George Alexander, Dean Emeritus


Patricia Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was included in one of the three plenary sessions at the annual LGBT Law Conference known as Lavender Law and sponsored by the National LGBT Law Association, an ABA affiliate. At this event, she also participated on four different panels, one dealing with income tax planning, one dealing with advanced estate planning issues, one on employee benefits, and one on creating change through administrative action.
  • She was quoted in the SF Chronicle and Bloomberg BusinessWeek about complicated questions arising from the repeal of DOMA. She also was quoted in widely reprinted stories in the  Anniston Star and its editorial pages, and in USA Today.
  • She gave two presentations to Santa Clara University audiences: one was to the LGBT faculty and staff group and the other was to the LGBT student group at the law school.

Colleen Chien, Associate Professor of Law

  • She was named one of the 50 most influential people shaping intellectual property toda by Managing Intellectual Property, , which cited Chien’s work on patent assertion entities, including the fact that she coined that term.. She also was quoted in Atlanta Journal-Constitution about patent trolls.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He spoke to MarketWatch about Dell’s shareholder issues.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He has given numerous talks and workshops, including a talk, “IP in the Online World—Social Media, Domain Names, Copyright and TM issues,” at the 4th Global Forum on Intellectual Property 2013, in Singapore, in August.
  • He was quoted by Bloomberg regarding a petition by state attorney generals to modify the Communications Decency Act.
  • He was named to ABA Journal’s top 100 law blogs, called Blawgs. He was also quoted in stories in MediaPost; N.J. Star-Ledger; Cincinnati Enquirer;Inc. magazine online, as well as  a widely reprinted New York Times story, discussing Twitter’s response to demands for user information in a case in France, and a Mercury News story, which ran in dozens of additional outlets, about Apple’s e-book ruling.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He contributes blog posts on immigration court decisions to the website of the national American Constitution Society for Law & Policy, most recently in August, in an entry titled “Immigration Federalism Post-Arizona.”
  • His op-ed, “Same-sex marriage decisions come with costs,” in USA Today, addressed some less appreciated features of the Supreme Court’s Defense of Marriage Act and Prop 8 decisions.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law


Margaret Russell, Professor of Law

  • She spoke to Real Clear Politics blog about whether the Supreme Court is acting like a lawmaking body. She also co-wrote an op-ed that ran in the San Francisco Chronicle comparing the Prop. 8 Supreme Court ruling and other “landmark” equality cases.

Gerald Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to Catholic News Service about marijuana laws, and to the LA Times about the slim chance for success by gay-marriage foes trying to halt wedding licenses.

Clinical Faculty News – August 2013


Full-Time Faculty News – July 2013

Pat Cain, Professor of Law

  • She discussed financial complexities to be resolved after the Supreme Court’s DOMA decision with the New York Times, a story that was picked up by several additional publications or sites. She also discussed similar subjects with Bloomberg and Forbes.
  • She participated in online webinar sponsored by the ABA Tax Section that included Shannon Minter, National Center for Lesbian Rights, and private attorneys from New York and DC and Florida who are experts on these issues.
  • She participated in a two hour CLE panel for the Santa Clara Bar Association.

Colleen Chien, Associate Professor of Law

  • She testified on Capitol Hill, her second appearance before Congress in the past year. She discussed abusive patent litigation in her appearance before the Intellectual Property and Internet Subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He spoke to CBS5 about erosions to the Voting Rights Act, and  was also a featured guest on multiple time slots on ABC7  and KTVU (Fox), helping analyze the DOMA and Prop. 8 decisions.

Bob Peterson, Professor of Law

  • He was part of a panel discussion in Las Vegas to the Association of California Insurance Companies (ACIC) on Uninsured/Underinsured motorist coverage.

Full-Time Faculty News – June 2013

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law


Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He presented “Branding and Trademark Challenges and Opportunities” at the Tenth Annual Stanford E-Commerce Best Practices Conference, Stanford Law School in June.
  • He was quoted in Time magazine about Obama’s plans for patent reform and in the Newark  Star Ledger about FTC’s actions against Wyndham Worldwide for allowing cyber theft.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He spoke to KPIX news and ABC 7 news on the Supreme Court Voting Rights Decision
  • He spoke to Bay City News about the upcoming Prop. 8 Supreme Court decision, for a story picked up by about a half dozen outlets.

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • She spoke to KCBS Radio from China, about the Apple e-Book trial alleging Apple conspired with the nation’s largest publishing houses, and she spoke to Voice of Russia radio about the visit of China’s president Xi Jinping to the U.S.

David Hasen, Associate Professor of Law

  • He spoke to spoke to KGO and KLIV radio, as well as KPIX news, about the tax implications and other effects of the Supreme Court ruling on DOMA and Proposition 8, which legalized same-sex marriages.

Brad Joondeph, Professor of Law

  • He discussed the same-sex cases as they were pending with the Mercury News and discussed the impact of the DOMA decision with the National Catholic Reporter.
  • He was quoted in a story on CBS5 about the Supreme Court’s ruling that DNA can be collected from arrested citizens.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law


Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • She spoke on “Neonaticide and Access to Abortion: Why the Law Doesn’t Matter,” at Addressing Filicide: Inaugural International Conference for Cross National Dialogue in Prato, Italy.

Margaret Russell, Professor of Law


Ed Steinman, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to CBS5 about the controversial secret government collection of phone and Internet data of U.S. citizens.

Gerald Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • spoke to the Ventura County Star about the future of gay-marriage litigation, and discussed legal strategies in the Prop. 8 case with the LA Times; his comments to the Timeswere cited in the Christian Science Monitor and cited or picked up by 33 other papers or sites.

Clinical Faculty News – June 2013

Angelo Ancheta, Executive Director, Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center

  • comments about the pending immigration bill for a Mercury Newsstory were carried on more than two dozen affiliated sites or papers.
  • He spoke to Latino USA, which aired on numerous NPR stations nationwide, about challenges to race-based admissions policies as a significant Supreme Court decision on the issue is pending.

Linda Starr, Legal Director, Northern California Innocence Project

  • She and NCIP were featured on KTVU (Fox) show Bay Area People, along with exoneree Maurice Caldwell.

Full-Time Faculty News – May 2013

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law


Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He discussed “Recent Developments with Section 230” at the 2013 World Technology Law Conference & Annual Meeting in Scottsdale, in May.
  • His comments to USA Today about the new Internet tax bill appeared in nearly four dozen publications. He also was quoted on tech-law issues in Social Times,iHealthBeat, and ReadWrite.

David Hasen, Associate Professor of Law

  • He wrote an editorial for MarketWatch on a bill that the Senate is considering to make sure taxes on internet sales are paid.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • His research suggesting a new way of handling patent-infringement claims against customers, was carried by Forbes.
  • He was part of a debate on the Wall Street Journal’s online Technology Report, on the question “Should Patents Be Awarded to Software?”. Professor Love argues that no, software patents don’t spur innovation, but impede it.

Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • She spoke on“Enlisting Doctors in the Post-Roe Abortion Wars: Informed Consent, Conscience Clauses & the Demise of Fiduciary Duty,” at the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, University of California at San Francisco Medical School.

Clinical Faculty News – May 2013


Full-Time Faculty News – April 2013

David Ball, Assistant Professor of Law


Pat Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was featured on several dozen public radio stations across the country after she did an interview for Morning Edition about the Supreme Court’s hearing on DOMA. She also spoke to NBC Bay Area about the topic.

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law

  • On April 17, 2013, she testified before the House Judiciary Committee’s Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet Subcommittee hearing on “Abusive Patent Litigation: The Issues Impacting American Competitiveness and Job Creation at the International Trade Commission and Beyond”. Here is a link to the hearing. Here is a link to Professor Chien’s written testimony. Professor Chien’s testimony was reported by Reuters, Computerworld, PCWorld and others.
  • She was named a “Woman of Influence” by the Silicon Valley Business Journal. From the intro sentence: “Chien is a global influence in the intellectual property community.”

Steve Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He spoke to MarketWatch for a widely republished story about Dell’s buyout efforts, and to Bloomberg Businessweek about the SEC allowing corporate disclosures via social media.

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in a widely reprinted USA Today story about privacy issues surrounding smart cars.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was quoted by Time Magazine regarding the YouTube copyright case.
  • He spoke to the Wall Street Journal about ADA issues online; to the Mercury News about the SEC allowing corporate disclosures via social media; and toMediaPost about AP’s win against a clipping service and a New York court upholding the “Amazon tax.” Advertising Age also interviewed him for a story on the value of data.
  • He was quoted in Hispanic Business regarding the decision Netflix received from the SEC about announcing corporate milestones, and other information, via social media technologies.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He wrote an op-ed on guns and immigration as barometers of who gets to be an American, for USA Today. It ran in more than a dozen other outlets as well.
  • He spoke with various media, including ABC 7, NBC Bay Area and the Bay City News,  about the Supreme Court’s hearing on California’s gay-marriage ban, Prop. 8.

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • She spoke to the press to help analyze Apple’s historic move to apologize to Chinese consumers for their warranty program. The following media carried her comments, with the resulting coverage appearing in 140 outlets:      San Jose Mercury News, New York TimesChina Daily, KCBS Radio, and KGO radio.

Ellen Kreitzberg, Professor of Law

  • She discussed California’s death penalty with KPCC.

Margaret Russell, Professor of Law

  • She spoke with various media, including NBC Bay Area, San Francisco Chronicle, Bloomberg Law‘s radio podcast, and the Bay City News,  about the Supreme Court’s hearing on California’s gay-marriage ban, Prop. 8.

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy

  • He spoke to Bloomberg Law‘s radio podcast about the controversy over the U.S. drone program.

Clinical Faculty News – April 2013

Caroline Chen, Director, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic and Assistant Clinical Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in a Mercury News story which featured Santa Clara Law’s Low Income Taxpayer Clinic and appeared in about two dozen papers or sites, including the Los Angeles Times and the Arizona Daily Star.

Northern California Innocence Project

  • An Oakland Tribune columnist did an in-depth story, which ran in numerous affiliated papers and sites, about the exoneration by NCIP of Ronald Ross.

Full-Time Faculty News – March 2013

Pat Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was on NPR Morning Edition as part of a panel discussing tax implications for the Supreme Court’s decision on the Defense of Marriage Act
  • An AP story in which she talked about possible income tax regulation changes for gay couples was carried in about 450 publications or sites including the Sacramento Bee, Boston Globe, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, USA Today and the Houston Chronicle.

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law


Steve Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News regarding the ouster of board members at Hewlett-Packard by major investors, just two years after a major boardroom shake-up.
  • was quoted in the Wall Street Journal regarding the “dueling CEOs” in Dell’s bid to become private.
  • spoke to MarketWatch about H-P’s battle with its institutional investors.

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in the Washington Post and USA Today about the legal issues with cars being linked to wireless networks. More than 60 percent of vehicles worldwide will be connected directly to the Internet by 2017, up from 11 percent last year, predicts ABI Research.There are few legal standards for what information a vehicle can collect, how it can be used and by whom. Each manufacturer produces its own onboard Internet systems, each with specific rules that few consumers review and even fewer understand, said privacy experts. “People are being duped into giving away a whole lot of information that maybe somebody ought to ask us about first,” said Dorothy J. Glancy, a Santa Clara University law professor who studies privacy and transportation. “It seems to me you ought to get a choice.”

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was named one of “The 50 Most Influential Law Professors Alive Today” by MJE.com.
  • was quoted in the Wall Street Journal regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act and online shopping websites.
  • was quoted by KQED about Reddit’s changes in its user agreement to avoid liability under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.
  • spoke to Reuters and Mashable about new FTC guidelines about advertising on social media. About 60 other publications or sites carried the story.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was interviewed by KLIV radio about the voting rights act case and by KGO radio about a state senate bill threatening to remove tax-exempt status for entities that discriminate against gay people.

Brad Joondeph, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to the San Jose Mercury News about the Obama administration acting against California’s Prop. 8.

Bob Peterson, Professor of Law

  • He gave a two day seminar in Sonoma to the CA State Assembly Insurance Law Committee on Insurance 101.

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy


Jerry Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in the LA Times regarding a trial of ex-city council members in the city of Bell who were charged with corruption.
  • spoke to Reuters for a widely reprinted story about the similarities between the swing vote justices on California’s high court and the Supreme Court.

Clinical Faculty News – March 2013

Northern California Innocence Project

  • Their second exoneration of the year, of Oakland’s Johnny Williams, generated more than 85 media mentions, including stories in AP, NBC Bay Area, the San Francisco Chronicle, Mercury News, CBS, Fox-TV, ABC, KGO radio, and others.

John Schunk, Associate Clinical Professor

  • He published an article, “Indirectly Assessing Writing and Analysis Skills in a First-tYear Legal Writing Course,” 40 So. Univ. L. Rev. 47-118 (Fall 2012).

Staff News – March

Deborah Moss-West, Assistant Director, Center for Social Justice and Public Service


Full-Time Faculty News – February 2013

Pat Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in CNNMoney about quirks in the adoption tax credit for same-sex couples. About 33 sites picked up the story.
  • was quoted in a New York Times article about the tax ramifications for same-sex married couples because, while some states recognize their marriages the federal government does not. Several other papers ran the story.

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law

  • She presented a new paper at the Patent and Trademark Office’s roundtable on software patents at Stanford University.
  • has received a $35,000 research grant from the New America Foundation to expand her work relating to “Start-ups and Trolls”. This grant will fund an expanded survey to determine the impacts of Patent Assertion Entities (PAEs) on the operations, growth, and innovation of startups. This version of the survey will also explore trends in patent purchasing, strategies for responding, and the market for “troll solution” providers.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law


Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was a guest on an ABC Nightline segment about “revenge porn,” or people posting risqué photos of exes online. He was also quoted about other tech-law cases by the Wall Street Journal, KQED radio, ReadWrite, and InformationWeek.
  • For the second year in a row, Professor Goldman has been named North American IP Thought Leader by Managing Intellectual Property. Read more…

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • She spoke to the San Jose Mercury News about Google leader Eric Schmidt’s criticisms of China in a new book. About two dozen other sites or papers carried the story.

Brad Joondeph, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to KCBS and the San Jose Mercury News about the Obama administration’s efforts to strike down Prop. 8. About a dozen other papers carried the story as well.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He spoke with the Chicago Tribune about the rejection by an appeals court of  Apple’s request to fast-track its bid for a sales ban on several Samsung phones.

Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • She spoke on “Informed Consent, Conscience Clauses, and the Newest Generation of Abortion Laws,” at the Stanford Law and Policy Review, Roe v. Wade at 40 Symposium.

Catherine Sandoval, Associate Professor of Law

  • She was floated as one of the “names under discussion” to be the next FCC chairman, by Time Magazine.

Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  • He wrote an op-ed urging a balanced approach to energy investment, which appeared in more than 40 papers across the country, including the Kansas City Star, Anchorage Daily News, and the Orange County Register.

Clinical Faculty News – February 2013

Caroline Chen, Director, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic and Assistant Clinical Professor of Law

What are work-based skills?

The aim of the work-based skills (WBS) requirement is to help you to demonstrate that you have put into practice the actuarial theory you gain through taking the exams.

What do I need to do?

You can find full details about this requirement in our Guide to work-based skills, but in summary you will need to do the following:

Appoint a supervisor

Once you have joined the IFoA and have received your Actuarial Reference Number (ARN), you need to talk to your employer about appointing a supervisor who will be responsible for your development.

It won’t matter if you have more than one supervisor during your training, but please call or email Education Services to tell us who the new supervisor is. You will need to make sure that your learning logs are each signed by the supervisor in place at the time you undertook the work and training.

If you do not have a supervisor, or are not currently employed you can defer starting your work-based skills until you are in actuarial employment or have an appointed supervisor.

Once you have an appointed supervisor then you can start to complete the work-based skills documents.

Complete learning logs

These are records of your "on the job" experience. You and your supervisor will complete the Work-based skills review form every 6 or 12 months.

You can find an example of a completed review form in the Guide to work-based skills. This will give you guidance about the content of your learning logs.

Answer review questions

These are short pieces of written work, presentations or other work which you have produced and discussed with your supervisor.

There are some sample review questions in the Guide to work-based skills to give you and your supervisor suggestions about what you should be covering.

How long will it take me?

You should start to maintain your learning logs when you start relevant employment. The minimum time required is then 1 year for Associateship, and 3 years for Fellowship.

If you have completed the minimum time but have not yet passed all the exams you will need to continue to complete learning logs until you pass your final exam. Your final learning log should be signed off no more than 60 days before your documents are received by the Education Services Team.

What do I have to do once I have passed all the exams and have at least the minimum of work-based skills records?

To be recorded as a 2017 qualifier you will need to meet the following deadlines:

By Friday 19 January 2018Send us all your learning logs and review questions, and a final sign off form completed and signed by a Fellow of an International Actuarial Association
By Monday 12 February 2018Resolve any final queries on your documents and have these signed off by us
By Friday 23 February 2018Sign and return the transfer form that we will send you

Appeals

You have a right to appeal against a rejection decision if you believe that you have met the minimum requirements for successful completion of your work-based skills requirements. You must submit your appeal within 50 days of receipt of the decision.

Read more about appeals

PPD changes 2017

Further to recent notifications about the new Personal and Professional Development (PPD) structure (which is replacing work-based skills), we are pleased to announce that more information about this has now been released.

Read more about Personal and Professional Development (PPD).

Related documents

You might also like

  • Student Handbook

    General information and practical advice that will be useful in your studies

Contact Details

Education Services Team

education.services@actuaries.org.uk

Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, 1st Floor, Park Central, 40/41 Park End Street, Oxford, OX1 1JD

+44 01865 268207

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